SUMMARY: Donald Trump’s sworn in as U.S. president

0
44
views
President Donald Trump, right, smiles with his son Barron as they view the 58th Presidential Inauguration parade for President Donald Trump in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Donald Trump was sworn in as U.S. president in Washington on Friday, taking over from Barack Obama.

Highlights of the day According to Reuters: SWEARING-IN Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president, vowing to end “American carnage” of social and economic woes in an inaugural address that was a populist and nationalist rallying cry.

POLICY The Trump administration says defeating “radical Islamic terror groups” will be its top foreign policy goal The new administration says its trade strategy to protect American jobs will start with withdrawal from the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact The administration quickly updates the White House website to say Trump is committed to eliminating the Obama administration’s Climate Action Plan and other environmental initiatives. Trump’s first official actions as president include sending his Cabinet nominations to the Senate and calling for a national day of patriotism.

PROTESTERS AND SUPPORTERS America’s political divisions turn violent on Washington’s streets during Trump’s inauguration, as black-clad anti-establishment activists set fires and clash with police while Trump supporters cheer the new chief executive. Trump supporters dance and drink in Washington to celebrate a president they say will shake up a corrupt, out-of-touch system. London’s Tower Bridge is the site of one of many protests around the world aimed at Trump.

THE ECONOMY, TRADE Investors are starting to wonder whether Trump will be a game changer bringing lower taxes and looser regulation. Germany’s finance minister says the United States must stick to international agreements under Trump. The U.S. stock market performed well during the transition to Trump, but investors should recall the oscillations that came with Obama.

INTERNATIONAL REACTION Trump’s inauguration is greeted with notes of caution by some foreign leaders. Mexico’s president says he wants to strengthen relations with his new U.S. counterpart, Donald Trump, whose threats and barbs against the country raised fears of a major economic crisis, and battered its currency. Germany will need a new economic strategy geared toward Asia should the new U.S. administration start a trade war with China, Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel says, warning against protectionism hours after was sworn in.

Trump takes charge, assertive but untested 45th US president

INAUGURATION SPEECH

(AP) — Pledging emphatically to empower America’s “forgotten men and women,” Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday, taking command of a riven nation facing an unpredictable era under his assertive but untested leadership.

Under cloudy, threatening skies at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol, Trump painted a bleak picture of the America he now leads, declaring as he had throughout the election campaign that it is beset by crime, poverty and a lack of bold action.

The billionaire businessman and reality television star — the first president who had never held political office or high military rank — promised to stir a “new national pride” and protect America from the “ravages” of countries he says have stolen U.S. jobs.

“This American carnage stops right here,” Trump declared. In a warning to the world, he said, “From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this moment on, it’s going to be America first.”

Eager to demonstrate his readiness to take actions, Trump went directly to the Oval Office Friday night, before the inaugural balls, and signed his first executive order as president — on “Obamacare.”

The order notes that Trump intends to seek the “prompt repeal” of the law. But in the meantime, it allows the Health and Human Services Department or other federal agencies to delay implementing any piece of the law that might impose a “fiscal burden” on states, health care providers, families or individuals.

Trump also signed commissions for two former generals confirmed to Cabinet posts earlier by the Senate: James Mattis as secretary of defense and John Kelly to head the Department of Homeland Security. Vice President Mike Pence swore them in soon after.

Mattis struck a different tone from his new boss in his first statement to his department: “Recognizing that no nation is secure without friends, we will work with the State Department to strengthen our alliances.”

At the inauguration, the crowd that spread out before Trump on the National Mall was notably smaller than at past inaugurals, reflecting both the divisiveness of last year’s campaign and the unpopularity of the incoming president compared to modern predecessors.

After the swearing-in, demonstrations unfolded in the streets of Washington. Police in riot gear deployed pepper spray after protesters smashed the windows of downtown businesses, denouncing capitalism and the new president.

Police reported more than 200 arrests by evening and said six officers had been hurt. At least one vehicle was set afire.

Short and pointed, Trump’s 16-minute address in the heart of Washington was a blistering rebuke of many who listened from privileged seats only feet away. Surrounded by men and women who have long filled the government’s corridors of power, the new president said that for too long, “a small group in our nation’s capital has reaped the rewards of government while the people have borne the cost.”

His predecessor, Obama, sat stoically as Trump pledged to push the country in a dramatically different direction.

Trump’s victory gives Republicans control of both the White House and Congress — and all but ensures conservatives can quickly pick up a seat on the closely divided Supreme Court.

Despite entering a time of Republican dominance, Trump made little mention of the party’s bedrock principles: small government, social conservativism and robust American leadership around the world.

He left no doubt he considers himself the product of a movement — not a party.

Trump declared his moment a fulfillment of his campaign pledge to take a sledgehammer to Washington’s traditional ways, and he spoke directly to the alienated and disaffected.

“What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people,” he said. “To all Americans in every city near and far, small and large from mountain to mountain, from ocean to ocean, hear these words: You will never be ignored again.”

But the speech offered scant outreach to the millions who did not line up behind his candidacy.

Trump’s call for restrictive immigration measures, religious screening of immigrants and his caustic campaign rhetoric about women and minorities angered millions. He did not directly address that opposition, instead offering a call to “speak our minds openly, debate our disagreements honestly, but always pursue solidarity.”

While Trump did not detail policy proposals Friday, he did set a high bar for his presidency. The speech was full of the onetime showman’s lofty promises to bring back jobs, “completely” eradicate Islamic terrorism, and build new roads, bridges and airports.

Despite Trump’s ominous portrait of America, he is taking the helm of a growing economy. Jobs have increased for a record 75 straight months, and the unemployment rate was 4.7 percent in December, close to a 9-year low.

Yet Trump’s victory underscored that for many Americans, the recovery from the Great Recession has come slowly or not at all. His campaign tapped into seething anger in working class communities, particularly in the Midwest, that have watched factories shuttered and the certainty of a middle class life wiped away.

Randy Showalter, a 36-year-old diesel mechanic and father of five from Mount Solon, Virginia, said he felt inspired as he stood and listened to Trump’s speech.

“I feel like there’s an American pride that I’ve never felt, honestly, in my life,” said Showalter, who donned Trump’s signature “Make America Great Again” red hat.

Trump’s journey to the inauguration was as unlikely as any in recent U.S. history. He defied his party’s establishment and befuddled the news media. He used social media to dominate the national conversation and challenge conventions about political discourse.

After years of Democratic control of the White House and deadlock in Washington, his was a blast of fresh air for millions.

At 70, Trump is the oldest person to be sworn in as president, marking a generational step backward after two terms for Obama, one of the youngest presidents to serve as commander in chief.

In a show of solidarity, all of the living American presidents attended the inaugural, except for 92-year-old George H.W. Bush, who was hospitalized this week with pneumonia. His wife, Barbara, was also in the hospital after falling ill.

But more than 60 House Democrats refused to attend Trump’s swearing-in ceremony in the shadow of the Capitol dome. One Democrat who did sit among the dignitaries was Hillary Clinton, Trump’s vanquished campaign rival who was widely expected by both parties to be the one taking the oath of office.

At a post-ceremony luncheon at the Capitol, Trump declared it was an honor to have her attend, and the Republicans and Democrats present rose and applauded.

While most of Trump’s first substantive acts as president will wait until Monday, he signed a series of papers formally launching his administration, including official nominations for his Cabinet. Sitting in an ornate room steps from the Senate floor, the president who had just disparaged the Washington establishment joked with lawmakers, including House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, and handed out presidential pens.

President Donald Trump smiles with his son Barron as they view the 58th Presidential Inauguration parade for President Donald Trump in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump walk along the Inaugurationa Trump walk along the Inauguration Day parade route after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, in Wash
White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, right, watches as White House Staff Secretary Rob Porter, center, hands President Donald Trump a confirmation order for James Mattis as defense secretary, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts as Melania Trump looks on during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) ‘
People stand on the National Mall to listen to the 58th Presidential Inauguration for President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama talk, as they pause on the steps of the East Front of the U.S. Capitol as the Obama’s depart, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Protestors gather around a debris fire during a demonstration after the inauguration of President Donald Trump, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
President Donald Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump, walks in his inaugural parade on Pennsylvania Ave. outside the White House, in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
The new @POTUS Twitter account for President Donald Trump is shown in this frame grab, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. The technological transition came just as Trump took the oath Friday, giving him a clean digital slate. The White House’s official Twitter and Facebook accounts were quickly scrubbed and rebranded. It’s the first time social media accounts have been a part of the transition. (AP Photo)
Share This!

Comments

comments